Essex by Pieter Van Den Keere antique map published 1651

£195.00

Essex ‘ESSEXIAE’ [Essex] by Pieter Van Den Keere (ex ‘Atlas Minor’) c.1651. Original 17th Century antique map of Essex engraved by Pieter Van Den Keere (Petrus Kaerius) and published in Mercator / Hondius / Jansson’s Atlas Minor (Amsterdam: Jansson, 1651). A nice clean map with text verso and the previous title page (see Product Gallery.) Paper size 9.25 x 7.25 inches.

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Essex ‘ESSEXIAE’ [Essex] by Pieter Van Den Keere (ex ‘Atlas Minor’) c.1651. Original 17th Century antique map of Essex engraved by Pieter Van Den Keere (Petrus Kaerius) and published in Mercator / Hondius / Jansson’s Atlas Minor (Amsterdam: Jansson, 1651). A detailed 17th Century map of Essex which was engraved by Pieter Van Den Keere (Petrus Kaerius) and published in Mercator / Hondius / Jansson’s Atlas Minor (Amsterdam: Jansson, 1651). This Essex map appeared only in the final edition of the atlas.  Supplied with the original text this is a rare example of Van Den Keere’s work.

Pieter Van Den Keere (c.1571-1646) (LatinPeter Kaerius 1571 – c. 1646) was a Dutch engraver, publisher and globe maker. His series of 44 plates for the British Isles, from about 1599, took a long time to publish. They were based on Christopher Saxton, Ortelius, and Giovanni Battista Boazio, respectively for England and Wales, Scotland, and Ireland. They appeared in 1617 in a Latin edition of the Britannia of William Camden, by Willem Blaeu. Later, these plates came to William Humble or George Humble (according to Royal Geographical Society fellow, Carl Moreland and David Bannister–map dealer–in “Antique Maps”) who issued them (with some modification and expansion) in 1627 as a miniature version of the atlas of John Speed. Thereby van den Keere’s works came by the name “Miniature Speeds”. Carl Moreland and David Bannister in “Antique Maps” state that in 1627 publisher George Humble “published a major edition of Speed’s Atlas,” who in turn “also issued” the van den Keere maps “as a pocket edition. For these he used the descriptive texts of the larger Speed maps and thereafter they were known as Miniature Speeds”. Moreland and Bannister also write that “of the 63 maps in the Atlas, 40 were from the original van den Keere plates.”

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