Yorkshire antique map East Riding Lincolnshire by cartographer John Cary published 1794

£35.00

Yorkshire antique map showing East Riding and part of Lincolnshire by cartographer John Cary. Original hand-coloured copper-plate engraved antique map from John Cary’s ‘New Maps of England and Wales with part of Scotland,’ published, 1794. Plate number 52 featuring: Yorkshire, Yorks, EastRiding, FlamboroughHead, Bridlington, Kilham, Urlham, Hornsea, Mappleton, Aldbrough, Garton, Grimston, Owthorne, Easington, Kilnsea, SpurnHead, RiverHumber, Beverley, Ferriby, KingstonUponHull, Hull, Drypool, Pattrington, Lincolnshire, Lincs, Barton, Grimsby, Brigg, Caistor, Cleethorp, BurtonConstable. Paper size 12.75 x 9.75 inches. Nice clean example of Cary’s work.

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Description

Yorkshire antique map showing East Riding and part of Lincolnshire by cartographer John Cary. Original hand-coloured copper-plate engraved antique map from John Cary’s ‘New Maps of England and Wales with part of Scotland,’ published, 1794. Plate number 52 featuring: Yorkshire, Yorks, EastRiding, FlamboroughHead, Bridlington, Kilham, Urlham, Hornsea, Mappleton, Aldbrough, Garton, Grimston, Owthorne, Easington, Kilnsea, SpurnHead, RiverHumber, Beverley, Ferriby, KingstonUponHull, Hull, Drypool, Pattrington, Lincolnshire, Lincs, Barton, Grimsby, Brigg, Caistor, Cleethorp, BurtonConstable.

John Cary (c. 1754 – 1835) was an English cartographer. Cary served his apprenticeship as an engraver in London, before setting up his own business in the Strand in 1783. He soon gained a reputation for his maps and globes, his atlas, The New and Correct English Atlas published in 1787, becoming a standard reference work in England. In 1794 Cary was commissioned by the Postmaster General to survey England’s roads. This resulted in Cary’s New Itinerary (1798), a map of all the major roads in England and Wales. He also produced Ordnance Survey maps prior to 1805. In his later life he collaborated on geological maps with the geologist William Smith. His business was eventually taken over by G. F. Cruchley (1822–1875).

Yorkshire abbreviated Yorks), formally known as the County of York, is a historic county of Northern England and the largest in the United Kingdom. Due to its great size in comparison to other English counties, functions have been undertaken over time by its subdivisions, which have also been subject to periodic reform. Throughout these changes, Yorkshire has continued to be recognised as a geographical territory and cultural region. The name is familiar and well understood across the United Kingdom and is in common use in the media and the military, and also features in the titles of current areas of civil administration such as North, South, West and East Ridings of Yorkshire.

 

 

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