Bangor suspension bridge Gwynedd Wales antique print

£20.00

Bangor suspension bridge Gwynedd Wales. Antique print from ‘Curiosities of Great Britain. England and Wales Delineated.’ Published c.1845 by Thomas Dugdale.  Print supplied mounted to 10×8 inches (ready to framein conservation quality ‘antique white’ mount-board. Engraved area approx. 6×4 inches. Note: Price shown is ex VAT

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Description

Bangor suspension bridge Gwynedd Wales. This steel engraved antique print, published in 1845, is from ‘Curiosities of Great Britain. England and Wales Delineated. Historical, Entertaining & Commercial, Alphabetically Arranged  by Thomas Dugdale, Antiquarian. Assisted by William Burnett.’  (Dugdale was a professional artist, whilst Burnett was a civil engineer by profession.) Together they produced a series of steel engraved prints of English and Welsh architectural and topographical features, together with County Maps.

Bangor is a city in Gwynedd, north west Wales, and is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. It is the oldest city in Wales. Historically in Caernarfonshire. It is one of only six places classed as a city in Wales. The origins of the city date back to the founding of a monastic establishment on the site of Bangor Cathedral by the Celtic saint Deiniol in the early 6th century AD. Bangor itself is an old Welsh word for a wattled enclosure, such as the one that originally surrounded the cathedral site. The present cathedral is a somewhat more recent building and has been extensively modified throughout the centuries. While the building itself is not the oldest, and certainly not the biggest, the bishopric of Bangor is one of the oldest in the UK. Another claim to fame is that the city allegedly has the longest High Street in Wales and the United Kingdom. Friars School was founded as a free grammar school in 1557, and the University was founded in 1884. In 1877, the former HMS Clio became a school ship, moored on the Menai Strait at Bangor, and had 260 pupils. Closed after the end of hostilities of World War I, she was sold for scrap and broken up in 1919. During World War II, parts of the BBC evacuated to Bangor during the worst of the Blitz.

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