Bank of England antique print published 1890

£20.00

Bank of England . Antique print from “London City. It’s History – Streets – Traffic – Buildings – People,” lithographed illustrations by W. Luker, Jr. A subscription edition published in 1890. By Command Dedicated to Her Majesty the Queen, who also headed the ‘List of Subscribers.’ Paper size approx. 11×9 inches (280mm x 230mm.) Nice clean example. Price shown is ex VAT.

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Bank of England. Antique print from “London City. It’s History – Streets – Traffic – Buildings – People,” lithographed illustrations by W. Luker, Jr. A subscription edition published in 1890. By Command Dedicated to Her Majesty the Queen, who also headed the ‘List of Subscribers.’

The Bank of England, formally the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, is the central bank of the United Kingdom and the model on which most modern central banks have been based. Established in 1694, it is the second oldest central bank in the world, after the Sveriges Riksbank, and the world’s 8th oldest bank. It was established to act as the English Government‘s banker and is still one of the bankers for the Government of the United Kingdom. The Bank was privately owned by stockholders from its foundation in 1694 until it was nationalised in 1946.

Lithography (from Ancient Greek λίθος, lithos, meaning ‘stone’, and γράφειν, graphein, meaning ‘to write’) is a method of printing originally based on the immiscibility of oil and water. The printing is from a stone (lithographic limestone) or a metal plate with a ball grained surface. It was invented in 1796 by German author and actor Alois Senefelder as a cheap method of publishing theatrical works. Lithography can be used to print text or artwork onto paper or other suitable material.

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