Barking Abbey Essex antique print published 1845

£20.00

Barking Abbey antique print. Antique print from ‘Curiosities of Great Britain. England and Wales Delineated,’ showing the abbey in Essex, but now in the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham. Published c.1845 by Thomas Dugdale.  Print supplied mounted to 10×8 inches (ready to framein conservation quality ‘antique white’ mount-board. Engraved area approx. 6×4 inches. Note: Price shown is ex VAT

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Description

Barking Abbey Essex antique print. This steel engraved antique print, published in 1845, is from ‘Curiosities of Great Britain. England and Wales Delineated. Historical, Entertaining & Commercial, Alphabetically Arranged  by Thomas Dugdale, Antiquarian. Assisted by William Burnett.’  (Dugdale was a professional artist, whilst Burnett was a civil engineer by profession.) Together they produced a series of steel engraved prints of English and Welsh architectural and topographical features, together with County Maps.

Barking Abbey is a former royal monastery located in Barking, in the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham. It has been described as “one of the most important nunneries in the country”. Originally established in the 7th century, from the late 10th century the abbey followed the Rule of St. Benedict. The abbey had a large endowment and sizable income but suffered severely after 1377, when the River Thames flooded around 720 acres (290 ha) of the abbey’s land, which was unable to be reclaimed. Despite this, at the time of the dissolution it was still the third wealthiest nunnery in England. The abbey continued to operate for almost 900 years, until its closure in 1539, as part of King Henry VIII‘s Dissolution of the Monasteries. During its existence, the abbey had many notable abbesses including several saints, former queens and the daughters of kings. The abbess of Barking held precedence over all other abbesses in England. The ruined remains of Barking Abbey now form part of a public open space known as Abbey Green.

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