Billingsgate New Market antique print 1852

£15.00

Billingsgate New Market antique print 1852. Original antique wood-block engraving of the new Billingsgate Market, published in the ‘Illustrated London News’ on 7th. August 1852. Image shows the riverside facade of the building with fishing boats docked and porters and fishermen at work. Half-page item with original text concerning the opening in time for the Oyster Season. Paper size 11 x 8 inches. Engraved area 8.5 x 5 inches. Slight foxing top left (see scan.)

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Billingsgate New Market antique print 1852. Original antique wood-block engraving of the new Billingsgate Market, published in the ‘Illustrated London News’ on 7th. August 1852. image shows the riverside facade of the building with fishing boats docked and porters and fishermen at work.

 

Billingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699. In 1850, the market, according to Horace Jones, “consisted only of shed buildings … The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade.” In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J. B. Bunning, the City architect. Bunning’s building was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning’s successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones.

The first issue of The Illustrated London News appeared on Saturday, 14 May 1842, timed to report on the young Queen Victoria‘s first masquerade ball. Its 16 pages and 32 wood engravingscovered topics such as the war in Afghanistan, a train crash in France, a survey of the candidates for the US presidential election, extensive crime reports, theatre and book reviews, and a list of births, marriages and deaths. By 1863 The Illustrated London News was selling more than 300,000 copies every week, enormous figures in comparison to other British newspapers of the time.  The ILN (as it was affectionately known) appeared weekly until 1971, then less frequently thereafter. Publication ceased in 2003.

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