Cannon Street Railway Bridge under construction 1865

£20.00

Cannon Street Railway Bridge under construction. Original antique print published on February 11th. in 1865, in the ‘Illustrated Times’ with the caption, ” The New Railway Bridge Across the Thames to Cannon Street, City.” Paper size 15.25 x 10.75. A quite rare item, with an early crease down the centre of the paper.

In stock

Description

Cannon Street Railway Bridge under construction, antique print 1865.

Original antique print published on February 11th. in 1865, in the ‘Illustrated Times’ with the caption, ” The New Railway Bridge Across the Thames to Cannon Street, City.”

Cannon Street’s name is derived from ‘candelwrichstrete’ or ‘street of candle makers’ it being in the City of London Ward of Candlewick.

Cannon Street Railway Bridge, was authorised by an Act of Parliament in 1861, together with Cannon Street Station station and the connecting railway.

An iron bridge, it was located between London Bridge and Southwark Bridge, to connect the South Eastern Railway to the City of London.

Cannon Street Station, the terminus, was strategically placed a short distance from Mansion House and the Bank of England, and would also provide a link to Charing Cross Station.

A regular river service between the two stations ran at 20 minute intervals and became a convenient way of travelling between the City and the West End, until the opening of the District Railway robbed the service of many of its passengers.

As to the bridge itself, it was originally named the Alexandra Bridge, after King Edward VII’s wife, Alexandra of Denmark, and was designed by Sir John Hawkshaw, engineer to the South Eastern Railway.

Supported by four iron Doric columns, fluted with Doric capitals, each column consists of a cylinder embedded in London clay and filled with concrete to the level of the bed, then lined with brickwork above.

The spanning part of the bridge is made of horizontal wrought iron plate girders, each 8.2 ft high. The bridge is 706 ft long. (Thank you to ‘engineering-timelines’ for this technical information.)

In our illustration, a barge is being unloaded on the south bank of the Thames, with two sailing barges moored on the river bank and a third tied to a buoy in the centre of the river.

With Cannon Street Station to the left, beneath the first arch can be seen the London Brewery building, whilst the second arch exposes the outline of part of Fishmongers’ Hall, and the third a span of London Bridge with a paddle-steamer moored beyond.

Peeping above the third column can be seen the viewing platform and fire-ball of Sir Christopher Wren’s Monument to the Great Fire of London.

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