antique print of Hawthornden Castle Midlothian Scotland

£20.00

Original antique chromolithograph of Hawthornden Castle Midlothian Scotland from “Souvenir of Scotland: its Cities, Lakes, and Mountains.” Published by T. Nelson and Sons, London, Edinburgh and New York, 1889.  Image size approx 5×3.4ins. Supplied mounted in 10×8 conservation antique white mount, ready to frame. Note: price shown is ex VAT

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Description

Hawthornden Castle is located on the River North Esk in Midlothian, Scotland. The castle lies a mile to the east of Roslin at grid reference NT287637, and is just downstream from Roslin Castle. Hawthornden comprises a 15th-century ruin, with a 17th-century L-plan house attached. The house has been restored and now serves as a writer’s retreat. Man-made caves in the rock beneath the castle have been in use for much longer than the castle itself.  Hawthornden was a property of the Abernethy family from the 13th century, and passed to the Douglases in the 14th century. The earliest parts of the castle date from the 15th century, and include a large three-storey tower, and the south curtain wall of a triangular courtyard. The castle was sacked twice by the Earl of Hertford in 1544 and 1547 during The Rough Wooing. In the 16th century, the castle was sold to Sir John Drummond, one of King James VI‘s ushers. His son, the poet Sir William Drummond, was born here, and later extended the castle. The L-shaped north range is his work, dated 1638, and probably replaced earlier buildings on this side of the courtyard. He was visited here in 1618 by English poet Ben Jonson, and the following century Dr Johnson also visited Hawthornden. This house has been much altered, including a major modernisation of the mid-19th century. The arms of the Abernethy family were installed above a door in 1795, by Dr William Abernethy Drummond, Bishop of Edinburgh. The bishop also added a memorial in honour of his ancestors Sir William Drummond and Sir Lawrence Abernethy of Hawthornden.

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