Fort Sumter Charleston Harbour American Civil War 1861

£40.00

Fort Sumter Charleston Harbour. Original antique print published in the ‘Illustrated Times,’ dated May 25th. 1861, it depicts the attack on Fort Sumter by Confederate forces, which led to the American Civil War. The text reads: “Birdseye view of the Bombardment of Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbour. – (from a sketch by M. Jackson.)” Paper size 14.5 x 10.25 inches. Price shown is ex VAT.

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Fort Sumter Charleston Harbour. Original antique print published in the ‘Illustrated Times,’ dated May 25th. 1861, it depicts the attack on Fort Sumter by Confederate forces, which led to the American Civil War. The text reads: “Birdseye view of the Bombardment of Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbour. – (from a sketch by M. Jackson.)”

Fort Sumter is a sea fort in Charleston, South Carolina, notable for two battles of the American Civil War. It was one of a number of special forts planned after the War of 1812, combining high walls and heavy masonry, and classified as Third System, as a grade of structural integrity. Work started in 1829, but was incomplete by 1860, when South Carolina seceded from the Union. The First Battle of Fort Sumter began on April 12, 1861, when Confederate artillery fired on the Union garrison, and in so doing started the American Civil War.

Charleston South Carolina. Charleston, the oldest and largest city in South Carolina, The city lies just south of the geographical midpoint of South Carolina’s coastline and is located on Charleston Harbour, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean formed by the confluence of the AshleyCooper, and Wando rivers.

The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865. The result of a long-standing controversy over slavery and states’ rights, war broke out in April 1861, when Confederates attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated as President of the United States. The nationalists of the Union proclaimed loyalty to the U.S. Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States of America, who advocated for states’ rights to perpetual slavery and its expansion in the Americas.

The Illustrated Times Weekly Newspaper was an English newspaper and rival to The Illustrated London News published between 1855 and 1862. The publisher was the Fleet Street bookseller David Bogue and the editor was Henry Vizetelly.

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