Great Britain steam-ship transporting emigrants to Australia 1852

£20.00

SS Great Britain steam-ship transporting emigrants to Australia antique print. Original antique print from ‘The Illustrated London News’ published in 1852 recording “The Great Britain steam-ship leaving Prince’s Pier, Liverpool, for Australia. Illustration size approx 9×5 inches (full page approx 15.5×10.5 inches.) Page folded at the centre, otherwise in very good condition. Full page includes the full report plus an image of emigrant ship “Ballengeich” leaving Southampton for Australia.  See Gallery Image to view the full page.

 

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Great Britain steam-ship transporting migrants to Australia antique print. Original antique print from ‘The Illustrated London News’ published in 1852 recording “The Great Britain steam-ship leaving Prince’s Pier, Liverpool, for Australia. See Gallery Image for the full report plus an image of emigrant ship “Ballengeich” leaving Southampton for Australia.  See Gallery Image to view the full page.

SS Great Britain is a museum ship and former passenger steamship, which was advanced for her time. She was the longest passenger ship in the world from 1845 to 1854. She was designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel(1806–1859), for the Great Western Steamship Company‘s transatlantic service between Bristol and New York. While other ships had been built of iron or equipped with a screw propeller, the Great Britain was the first to combine these features in a large ocean-going ship. She was the first iron steamer to cross the Atlantic, which she did in 1845, in the time of 14 days.

The first issue of The Illustrated London News appeared on Saturday, 14 May 1842, timed to report on the young Queen Victoria‘s first masquerade ball. Its 16 pages and 32 wood engravings covered topics such as the war in Afghanistan, a train crash in France, a survey of the candidates for the US presidential election, extensive crime reports, theatre and book reviews, and a list of births, marriages and deaths. By 1863 The Illustrated London News was selling more than 300,000 copies every week, enormous figures in comparison to other British newspapers of the time.  The ILN (as it was affectionately known) appeared weekly until 1971, then less frequently thereafter. Publication ceased in 2003.

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