Hereford on the River Wye antique print 1845

£20.00

Hereford, which lies on the River Why,  is a cathedral city, civil parish and county town of Herefordshire. This original antique print, published c.1845 by Thomas Dugdale. (A nice clean image) is supplied mounted to 10×8 inches (ready to framein conservation quality ‘antique white’ mount-board. Engraved area approx. 6×4 inches. Note: Price shown is ex VAT

In stock

Description

Hereford, which lies on the River Wye, is a cathedral city, civil parish and county town of Herefordshire. The name “Hereford” is said to come from the Anglo-Saxon “here”, an army or formation of soldiers, and the “ford“, a place for crossing a river. If this is the origin it suggests that Hereford was a place where a body of armed men forded or crossed the Wye. The Welsh name for Hereford is Henffordd, meaning “old road”, and probably refers to the Roman road and Roman settlement at nearby Stretton Sugwas. This antique steel engraved print of the cathedral and bridge over the River Wye, is from ‘Curiosities of Great Britain. England and Wales Delineated. Historical, Entertaining & Commercial, Alphabetically Arranged by Thomas Dugdale, Antiquarian. Assisted by William Burnett.’ (Dugdale was a professional artist, whilst Burnett was a civil engineer by profession.) Together they produced a series of steel engraved prints of English and Welsh architectural and topographical features, together with County Maps.

Steel engraving is a technique for printing illustrations based on steel instead of copper. It has been rarely used in artistic printmaking, although it was much used for reproductions in the 19th century. Steel engraving was introduced in 1792 by Jacob Perkins (1766–1849), an American inventor, for banknote printing.

Thanks to Wikipedia for the linked information.

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