John Wilkes radical journalist and politician antique print

£15.00

John Wilkes radical journalist, publisher and Member of Parliament. Guaranteed Victorian antique print (steel engraving) by James Moore from the original by William Hogarth. Nice clean example. Paper size approx 12 x 8 inches. Price shown is ex VAT.

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John Wilkes radical journalist. Guaranteed Victorian antique print (steel engraving) by James Moore from the original by William Hogarth.

John Wilkes (17 October 1725 – 26 December 1797) was a British radical, journalist, and politician. Wilkes was born in 1725 in London to the prosperous distiller Israel Wilkes Jr. and was a brother to the businesswoman Mary Hayley. He was first elected Member of Parliament in 1757. In the Middlesex election dispute, he fought for the right of his voters—rather than the House of Commons—to determine their representatives. In 1768, angry protests of his supporters were suppressed in the St George’s Fields Massacre. In 1771, he was instrumental in obliging the government to concede the right of printers to publish verbatim accounts of parliamentary debates. In 1776, he introduced the first bill for parliamentary reform in the British Parliament. During the American War of Independence, he was a supporter of the American rebels, adding further to his popularity with American Whigs. In 1780, however, he commanded militia forces which helped put down the Gordon Riots, damaging his popularity with many radicals. This marked a turning point, leading him to embrace increasingly conservative policies which caused dissatisfaction among the progressive-radical low-to-middle income landowners. This was instrumental in the loss of his Middlesex parliamentary seat in the 1790 general election. At the age of 65, Wilkes retired from politics and took no part in the social reforms following the French Revolution, such as Catholic Emancipationin the 1790s. During his life, he earned a reputation as a libertine.

Steel engraving is a technique for printing illustrations based on steel instead of copper. It has been rarely used in artistic printmaking, although it was much used for reproductions in the 19th century. Steel engraving was introduced in 1792 by Jacob Perkins (1766–1849), an American inventor, for banknote printing. When Perkins moved to London in 1818, the technique was adapted in 1820 by Charles Warren and especially by Charles Heath (1785–1848) for Thomas Campbell’s Pleasures of Hope, which contained the first published plates engraved on steel. The new technique only partially replaced the other commercial techniques of that time such as woodcut, wood engraving, copper engraving and later lithography.

 

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