antique print of Loch Lomond at Tarbet Scotland

£20.00

Original antique chromolithograph of Loch Lomond at Tarbet from, “Souvenir of Scotland: its Cities, Lakes, and Mountains.” Published by T. Nelson and Sons, London, Edinburgh and New York, 1889.  Image size approx 5×3.4ins. Supplied mounted in 10×8 conservation antique white mount, ready to frame. Note: price shown is ex VAT.

In stock

Description

Tarbet (Scottish Gaelic: An Tairbeart, in full Tairbeart Loch Laomainn) is a small village in Argyll and Bute, Scotland. Located within the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park. Traditionally on the northern fringes of the historic County of Dunbartonshire, it is on the banks of Loch Lomond, and has a pier. It stands on an isthmus where Loch Long and Loch Lomond come close.Its name comes from the Scottish Gaelic word for isthmus, although Tarbert is the more common anglicization, and Tarbat also exists. Loch Lomond is a freshwater loch lying on the Highland Boundary Fault, often considered the boundary between the lowlands of Central Scotland and the Highlands. It is 24 miles (39 km) long and between 0.75 and 5 miles (1.21 and 8.05 km) wide. It has an average depth of about 121 feet (37 m), and a maximum depth of about 620 feet (190 m). Its surface area is 27 sq mi (70 km2), and it has a volume of 0.62 cu mi (2.6 km3). Of all the lochs and lakes in Great Britain, it is the largest by surface area and the second largest (after Loch Ness) by water volume. Within the United Kingdom, it is surpassed only by Lough Neagh and Lough Erne in Northern Ireland and regarding the British Isles as a whole, there are also several larger loughs in the Republic of Ireland. Traditionally a boundary between Stirlingshire and Dunbartonshire, Loch Lomond is currently split between the council areas of Stirling, Argyll and Bute and West Dunbartonshire. Its southern shores are about 14 miles (23 km) north of Glasgow, Scotland’s largest city. Loch Lomond is now part of Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. Ben Lomond is on the eastern shore: 3,195 feet (974 m) in height and the most southerly of the Scottish Munro peaks. A 2005 poll of Radio Times readers voted Loch Lomond as the sixth greatest natural wonder in Britain. The main arterial route along the loch is the A82 road which runs the length of its western shore. For a long time, this was a notorious bottleneck, with the route clogged with tourists during the summer months. It was upgraded in the 1980s and 1990s, although the stretch north of Tarbet remains unimproved.

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