Mercers Hall Cheapside London antique print 1811

£25.00

antique print of the entrance to the old Mercers’ Hall, Cheapside, in 1811. This façade was removed to Swanage, Dorset, where it became the Town Hall entrance. Drawn and engraved by T. L. Busby (fl. 1804-1837.) Published by Aspherne, Cornhill, March, 1811. Engraved area approx. 7×4 inches. A rare/scarce item in very good condition.

See  Product Gallery for a view of the Mercers’ Hall entrance c.1830, by Thomas Shepherd. NOTE: Price shown is ex VAT.

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Description

Mercers Hall Cheapside antique print. Antique copper-plate engraved print, published as the Frontispiece for the European Magazine, March 1811. Mercers Hall entrance, which was removed to Swanage, Dorset, where it became the Town Hall entrance. Meeting place of the Worshipful Company of Mercers, the premier livery company in the City of London. It’s Royal Charter dating from 1394. Company motto: Honor Deo (Honour God.) See Product Gallery image for a steel engraving by Thomas Shepherd c.1830.

The European Magazine was a monthly magazine published in London. Eighty-nine semi-annual volumes were published from 1782 until 1826. It was launched as the European Magazine, and London Review in January 1782, promising to offer “the Literature, History, Politics, Arts, Manners, and Amusements of the Age.” It was in direct competition with The Gentleman’s Magazine, and in 1826 was absorbed into the Monthly Magazine. Soon after launching the European Magazine, its founding editor, James Perry, passed proprietorship to the Shakespearean scholar Isaac Reed and his partners John Sewell and Daniel Braithwaite, who guided the magazine during its first two decades. The articles and other contributions in the magazine appeared over initials or pseudonyms and have largely remained anonymous. Scholars believe that the contributions include the first published poem by William Wordsworth (1787) and the earliest known printing of “O Sanctissima“, the popular Sicilian Mariners Hymn (1792).

 

 

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