Oatlands Surrey antique print of view of the River Thames

£25.00

Oatlands Surrey view of the River Thames from the Terrace, from: ‘A New Display of  the Beauties of England or a description of the most elegant or magnificent public edifices, royal palaces, noblemen’s and gentlemen’s seats, and other curiosities, natural or artificial in different parts of the kingdom: adorned with a variety of copper plate cuts, neatly engraved,’ published c.1776 by Robert Goadby. A rare Georgian print. Paper size approx. 8 x 5 inches. Excellent condition. Price shown is ex VAT.

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Oatlands Surrey antique print. Copper-plate engraved print of the “view from the Terrace at Oatlands,” of the River Thames, from: ‘A New Display of  the Beauties of England or a description of the most elegant or magnificent public edifices, royal palaces, noblemen’s and gentlemen’s seats, and other curiosities, natural or artificial in different parts of the kingdom: adorned with a variety of copper plate cuts, neatly engraved,’ published c.1776 by Robert Goadby. Published in the year of the American Revolution! A rare Georgian print.

Oatlands Palace is a former Tudor and Stuart royal palace which took the place of the former manor of the village of Oatlands in Surrey, England. Little remains of the original building, so excavations of the palace took place in 1964 to rediscover its extent. Charles used it for his queen’s residence, employed John Tradescant the elder for its gardens. After the King’s execution some Royal residencies, were sold by the Commonwealth Government to help pay Parliamentary debts. Oatlands Palace and its content were purchased for about £4,000 by Robert Turbridge. He demolished it and sold the bricks to Sir Richard Weston of Sutton Place.

Robert Goadby (1721–1778) was an English printer and publisher in SherborneDorset. He was a Whig supporter, and influential through his newspaper, the Sherborne Mercury. He was also responsible for the biography of the rogue Bampfylde Moore Carew; Goadby and his wife have both in fact been claimed as the author of a popular work on his life that gave Carew the status of folk heroHis publishing business was large for a small provincial centre, and his Sherborne Mercury was an influential journal in South West England. He also published from 1744 The Western Flying Post, amalgamated into the Mercury in 1748. Goadby made enemies as well as friends by his plain speaking and views. He died after a long illness on 12 August 1778, and was buried in Oborne. He was a religious man and naturalist, and bequeathed an endowment providing for the preaching of a sermon on the first Sunday of May in every year in Sherborne Church on the beauties of nature. As the endowment became too valuable for its purposes, provision for the poor was made with the surplus.

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