Paris revolution in France 1848 antique print

£20.00

Paris during the French Revolution of 1848. Original antique print from the Illustrated London News, published in 1848, depicting “The slaughter at the Hotel of the Minister of Foreign Affairs” in Paris.Size of printed image 9.25 x 5 inches.

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Paris during the French Revolution of 1848. Original antique print from the Illustrated London News, published in 1848, depicting “The slaughter at the Hotel of the Minister of Foreign Affairs” in Paris.

The text below is from a blog published on 22nd. February 2019  in ‘In Your Area‘ a site belonging to publishers Reach plc.

“Today 22nd. February in 1848 is generally accepted as the day The French Revolution of 1848 began. The 1848 Revolution, sometimes known as the February Revolution (révolution de Février), was one of a wave of revolutions in Europe. Republican insurrections against European monarchies began in Sicily and spread to France, Germany, Italy, and the Austrian Empire. In Great Britain, a petition signed by millions of people was presented to the House of Commons seeking universal male suffrage. In France, the revolutionary events ended the ‘July Monarchy’ of the Bourbon King Louis Philippe and led to the creation of the French Second Republic. In the months that followed the February revolution, the government pursued a course that became increasingly conservative. On 23 June 1848, Parisians rose in insurrection, in what became known as the ‘June Days’ uprising. It was a bloody but unsuccessful rebellion by the Paris workers against increasingly conservative government policies. On 2 December 1848, Louis Napoleon Bonaparte was elected President of the Second Republic, largely with support from the non-urban France and in particular the peasantry. Three years later, Louis Napoleon Bonaparte suspended the elected assembly and established the Second French Empire, which lasted until 1870. Louis Napoleon thereby becoming the last French monarch. On his downfall in 1870 he took refuge in England with his wife and son, the Prince Imperial, living at Camden House, in Chislehurst, Kent. On his father’s death in January 1873, the Prince Imperial was proclaimed by the Bonapartist faction as Napoleon IV, Emperor of France. However, he was killed in South Africa serving as a British cavalry officer during the Anglo-Zulu campaign of 1879. Thus ended the life of the last serious pretender to the throne of France.

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