Salvation Army Darkest England and the Way Out

£10.00

Salvation Army’s Darkest England and the Way Out. An original illustrative map that accompanied William Booth’s book “Darkest England and the Way Out”, published in 1890, with the assistance of William Thomas Stead. In his book, Booth outlined his plans for social reform which would end unemployment in Britain by moving the unemployed from sweated workshops to farm colonies and thence to overseas colonies. Paper size xxxxxxxxxxx  See scan for creases in the paper.

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Salvation Army’s Darkest England and the Way Out. An original illustrative map that accompanied William Booth’s book “Darkest England and the Way Out”, published in 1890, with the assistance of William Thomas Stead. In his book, Booth outlined his plans for social reform which would end unemployment in Britain by moving the unemployed from sweated workshops to farm colonies and thence to overseas colonies.

The  Salvation Army was founded in 1865 in London’s east-end by one-time Methodist circuit-preacher William Booth and his wife Catherine as the East London Christian Mission and can trace its origins to the Blind Beggar public house in Whitechapel. In 1878 Booth reorganised the mission, becoming its first General and introducing the military structure. In east London, as well as campaigning against sweated labour, led by example in establishing a match factory paying significantly better wages than the ‘sweaters’. “The three ‘S’s’ best expressed the way in which the Army administered to the ‘down and outs’: first, soup; second, soap; and finally, salvation.” 

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