Sir Samuel Hood 1st Viscount Hood antique print 1807

£20.00

Sir Samuel Hood later 1st Viscount Hood pictured in his Royal Navy uniform. Antique print of  Sir Samuel Hood (Lord Hood), published in the ‘European Magazine’ and dated in the plate 1st September 1807. ‘Engraved by Ridley Holl & Blood from an Original Miniature in the possession of Lady Hood.’ A nice clean example of a scarce lithograph. Paper measures 8.25 x 5 inches. Price shown is ex VAT.

In stock

Description

Sir Samuel Hood later 1st Viscount Hood pictured in his Royal Navy uniform. Antique print of Sir Samuel Hood, later Lord Hood, published in the ‘European Magazine’ and dated in the plate 1st September 1807. ‘Engraved by Ridley Holl & Blood from an Original Miniature in the possession of Lady Hood.’

Admiral Samuel Hood, 1st Viscount Hood (12 December 1724 – 27 January 1816) was a Royal Navy officer. As a junior officer he saw action during the War of the Austrian Succession. While in temporary command of Antelope, he drove a French ship ashore in Audierne Bay, and captured two privateers in 1757 during the Seven Years’ War. He held senior command as Commander-in-Chief, North American Station and then as Commander-in-Chief, Leeward Islands Station, leading the British fleet to victory at Battle of the Mona Passage in April 1782 during the American Revolutionary War. He went on to be Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth, then First Naval Lord and, after briefly returning to the Portsmouth command, became Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Fleet during the French Revolutionary Wars.

The European Magazine was a monthly magazine published in London. Eighty-nine semi-annual volumes were published from 1782 until 1826. It was launched as the European Magazine, and London Review in January 1782, promising to offer “the Literature, History, Politics, Arts, Manners, and Amusements of the Age.” It was in direct competition with The Gentleman’s Magazine, and in 1826 was absorbed into the Monthly Magazine Soon after launching the European Magazine, its founding editor, James Perry, passed proprietorship to the Shakespearean scholar Isaac Reed and his partners John Sewell and Daniel Braithwaite, who guided the magazine during its first two decades. The articles and other contributions in the magazine appeared over initials or pseudonyms and have largely remained anonymous. Scholars believe that the contributions include the first published poem by William Wordsworth (1787) and the earliest known printing of “O Sanctissima“, the popular Sicilian Mariners Hymn (1792).

 

Product Categories