Sevastopol (Siege of Sebastopol) Crimea Russia antique print

£20.00

Sevastopol (Siege of Sebastopol) plan of the Allied Armies Winter Quarters in Crimea. Original antique print from the Illustrated London News, published 1855. Approx. size of paper 16×11 inches. See scan for foxing to top and left of paper. Price shown is ex VAT

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Plan of Sevastopol (Siege of Sebastopol) during the Crimean War. Antique print, published in 1855, showing Sebastopol and the winter Quarters of the Allied troops. The Siege of Sevastopol (at the time called in English the Siege of Sebastopol) lasted from September 1854 until September 1855, during the Crimean War. The allies (FrenchOttoman, and British) landed at Eupatoria on 14 September 1854, intending to make a triumphal march to Sevastopol, the capital of the Crimea, with 50,000 men. The 56-kilometre (35 mi) traverse took a year of fighting against the Russians. Major battles along the way were Alma (September 1854), Balaklava (October 1854), Inkerman (November 1854), Tchernaya (August 1855), Redan (September 1855), and, finally, Sevastopol (September 1855). During the siege, the allied navy undertook six bombardments of the capital, on 17 October 1854; and on 9 April, 6 June, 17 June, 17 August, and 5 September 1855. Sevastopol is one of the classic sieges of all time. The city of Sevastopol was the home of the Tsar’s Black Sea Fleet, which threatened the Mediterranean. The Russian field army withdrew before the allies could encircle it. The siege was the culminating struggle for the strategic Russian port in 1854–1855 and was the final episode in the Crimean War. During the Victorian Era, these battles were repeatedly memorialized. The Siege was the subject of Crimean soldier Leo Tolstoy‘s Sebastopol Sketches and the subject of the first Russian feature film, Defence of Sevastopol. The Battle of Balaklava was made famous by Alfred, Lord Tennyson‘s poem “The Charge of the Light Brigade” and Robert Gibb‘s painting The Thin Red Line, as well as by a panorama of the siege painted by Franz Roubaud. Treating the wounded from these battles were celebrated English nurses Mary Seacole and Florence Nightingale.

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