Sikh British Army infantry scale walls of Peking antique print

£20.00

Sikh British Army infantry scale walls of Peking antique print. Original antique page from the Illustrated London News, dated 24th. November, 1900, showing Captain Soady, a sikh officer, scaling the walls of Peking (Beijing) during the Boxer Rebellion. On reaching the top, Soady removed his turban and waved it to encourage his men before using it to assist his comrades in climbing the wall. Paper size 15.5 x 11.5 inches. Excellent condition. Price shown is ex VAT.

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Sikh British Army infantry scale walls of Peking antique print. Original antique page from the Illustrated London News, dated 24th. November, 1900, showing Captain Soady, a sikh officer, scaling the walls of Peking (Beijing) during the Boxer Rebellion. On reaching the top, Soady removed his turban and waved it to encourage his men before using it to assist his comrades in climbing the wall.

The Boxer Rebellion (拳亂), Boxer Uprising, or Yihetuan Movement (義和團運動) was an anti-foreign, anti-colonial, and anti-Christian uprising that took place in China between 1899 and 1901, toward the end of the Qing dynasty. They were motivated by proto-nationalist sentiments and by opposition to Western colonialism and the Christian missionary activity that was associated with it.

Sikh is a person associated with Sikhism, a monotheistic religion that originated in the 15th century, in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent, based on the revelation of Guru Nanak. The term “Sikh” has its origin in the Sanskrit words शिष्य (śiṣya), meaning a disciple, or a student. A Sikh, according to Article I of the Sikh Rehat Maryada (the Sikh code of conduct), is “any human being who faithfully believes in One Immortal Being; ten Gurus, from Guru Nanak to Guru Gobind SinghGuru Granth Sahib; the teachings of the ten Gurus and the baptism bequeathed by the tenth Guru.

The first issue of The Illustrated London News appeared on Saturday, 14 May 1842, timed to report on the young Queen Victoria‘s first masquerade ball. Its 16 pages and 32 wood engravings covered topics such as the war in Afghanistan, a train crash in France, a survey of the candidates for the US presidential election, extensive crime reports, theatre and book reviews, and a list of births, marriages and deaths. By 1863 The Illustrated London News was selling more than 300,000 copies every week, enormous figures in comparison to other British newspapers of the time.  The ILN (as it was affectionately known) appeared weekly until 1971, then less frequently thereafter. Publication ceased in 2003.

 

 

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