Southwark Bridge across River Thames antique print 1890

£20.00

Southwark Bridge across River Thames, looking towards St. Paul’s Cathedral. Antique print from “London City. It’s History – Streets – Traffic – Buildings – People,” lithographed illustrations by W. Luker, Jr. A subscription edition published in 1890. By Command Dedicated to Her Majesty the Queen, who also headed the ‘List of Subscribers.’ Paper size approx. 11×9 inches (280mm x 230mm.) Nice clean example. Price shown is ex VAT.

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Southwark Bridge across River Thames looking towards St. Paul’s Cathedral. Antique print from “London City. It’s History – Streets – Traffic – Buildings – People,” lithographed illustrations by W. Luker, Jr. A subscription edition published in 1890. By Command Dedicated to Her Majesty the Queen, who also headed the ‘List of Subscribers.’

Southwark Bridge. The subject of this lithograph, was designed by John Rennie, and opened on the site in 1819. It was originally known as Queen Street Bridge. The bridge consisted of three large cast-iron spans supported by granite piers. The bridge was notable for having the longest cast iron span, 240 feet (73 m), ever made. The iron spans were cast in Masborough, Rotherham. It was a commercial tolled operation which was trying to compete with the toll free Blackfriars and London bridges nearby, but the company became bankrupt and its interest were acquired by the Bridge House Estates which then made it toll free in 1864. It was replaced in 1920.

Lithography (from Ancient Greek λίθος, lithos, meaning ‘stone’, and γράφειν, graphein, meaning ‘to write’) is a method of printing originally based on the immiscibility of oil and water. The printing is from a stone (lithographic limestone) or a metal plate with a ball grained surface. It was invented in 1796 by German author and actor Alois Senefelder as a cheap method of publishing theatrical works. Lithography can be used to print text or artwork onto paper or other suitable material.

The City of London is a city and county that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district (CBD) of London. It constituted most of London from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the agglomeration has since grown far beyond the City’s borders. The City is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of London, though it remains a notable part of central London.

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