Dreadnought ‘Thunderer’ launched at Thames Iron Works

£10.00

Dreadnought ‘Thunderer’ launched at the Thames Iron Works on 1st February 1911. Original four-page Supplement to The Sphere newspaper published February 11th. 1911, containing 18 photographs of the launch. Folded across centre (see scan.) Page size 16.75 x12 inches.

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Dreadnought Thunderer launched at the Thames Iron Works on 1st February 1911. Original four-page Supplement to The Sphere newspaper published February 11th. 1911, containing 18 photographs of the the launch.

The dreadnought was the predominant type of battleship in the early 20th century. The first of its kind, the Royal Navy‘s Dreadnought made such a strong impression on people’s minds when launched in 1906 that similar battleships built subsequently were referred to generically as “dreadnoughts”, and earlier battleships became known as “pre-dreadnoughts”. Dreadnoughts design had two revolutionary features: an “all-big-gun” armament scheme, with more heavy-calibre guns than previous ships, and steam turbine propulsion.

The Sphere: An Illustrated Newspaper for the Home and, later, The Sphere: The Empire’s Illustrated Weekly, was a British newspaper, published by London Illustrated Newspapers weekly from 27 January 1900 until the closure of the paper on 27 June 1964.

The Thames Ironworks and Shipbuilding Company, Limited was a shipyard and iron works straddling the mouth of Bow Creek at its confluence with the River Thames, at Leamouth Wharf (often referred to as Blackwall) on the west side and at Canning Town on the east side. Its main activity was shipbuilding, but it also diversified into civil engineering, marine engines, cranes, electrical engineering and motor cars. The company notably produced iron work for Isambard Kingdom Brunel‘s Royal Albert Bridge over the Tamar in the 1850s, and the world’s first all-iron warship, HMS Warrior, launched in 1860.

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