Theatre Royal Drury Lane antique front of house bill 1834

£50.00

Theatre Royal Drury Lane antique front of house bill. Original Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, front of house bill, advertising the ‘Merchant of Venice’ performance on Saturday October 25th, 1834. The cast list includes Manfred Denvil as ‘Shylock.’  This bill would have advertised a performance at the current building which opened in 1812. Paper size 8 x 13.5 inches. Some light foxing along the right-hand edge. Uneven to the left where removed from the binding (see scan.)

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Theatre Royal Drury Lane antique front of house bill. Original Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, front of house bill, advertising the ‘Merchant of Venice’ performance on Saturday October 25th, 1834. Cast list includes Manfred Denvil as ‘Shylock.’  This bill would have advertised a performance at the current building which opened in 1812.

The Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, commonly known as Drury Lane, is a West End theatre and Grade I listed building in Covent Garden, London, England. The building faces Catherine Street (earlier named Bridges or Brydges Street) and backs onto Drury Lane. The building is the most recent in a line of four theatres which were built at the same location, the earliest of which dated back to 1663, making it the oldest theatre site in London still in use.  The first theatre on the site was built at the behest of Thomas Killigrew in the early 1660s, when theatres were allowed to reopen during the English Restoration. Initially known as “Theatre Royal in Bridges Street”, the theatre’s proprietors hired prominent actors who performed at the theatre on a regular basis, including Nell Gwyn and Charles Hart. In 1672, the theatre caught fire and Killigrew built a larger theatre on the same plot, renamed the “Theatre Royal in Drury Lane”; it opened in 1674. This building lasted nearly 120 years, under the leaderships of Colley CibberDavid Garrick and Richard Brinsley Sheridan, the last of whom employed Joseph Grimaldi as the theatre’s resident Clown. In 1791, under Sheridan’s management, the building was demolished to make way for a larger theatre which opened in 1794. This new Drury Lane survived for 15 years before burning down in 1809. The building that stands today opened in 1812.

 

 

 

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